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Revisiting My Collard Greens recipe, this time, with an actual recipe!via Soul Food Fusion Feast: Collard Greens, White Truffle Sriracha Macaroni and Cheese, and the Works!Since I am making my greens for Thanksgiving tomorrow, I decided to include an actual written recipe with the repost:

Collard Greens w Hog Jowl Bacon

2 pkgs (the big ones) of shredded collard greens from the produce aisle (walmart carries them)

1 chopped onion

1 tsp red pepper flakes

4 tsp chicken bouillon

garlic powder (lots, to taste)

black pepper

1/4 cup of sugar

1/4-1/2 cup white vinegar

one BIG HUNK of Jowl bacon, chopped in bigger chunks

Fill a huge stock pot with the greens and everything. Cover with water just to line of greens. If it seems too much for pot, it will reduce- don’t worry.

Put pot on high and bring to boil- keep tasting the broth throughout the cooking process and adjust the garlic powder/ vinegar/sugar ratio. Turn down to simmer and cover til greens are tender and bacon is fork tender and melty- about 3-5 hours-

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VINTAGE RECIPE: My Great Aunt Susie’s Deviled Eggs Recipe! (My 2018 Updated Version)

deviled eggs Aunt Susie's

In my effort to chronicle my paternal great-aunts’ best recipes, I have another that I want to experiment with. All of these lovely women have since passed away- and even my health is in question currently- so it just feels like the right thing to do.

To put it in perspective, my grandfather was born 100 yrs ago this year, to me, it’s imperative to write these things down before they get lost to future generations.

This recipe was given to me by my cousins Jeremy and Meleta- Aunt Susie was his grandmother.

A zillion thanks to you guys-I love you!

Today, I will attempt Susie Donoho Stoke’s family-famous deviled eggs:

I cheated and bought pre boiled/peeled eggs, because it’s Thanksgiving tomorrow and I already have too much to do.

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I used Miracle Whip, because I remember my grandmother and aunts using this instead of mayo, except I did a ratio of 3 part MW to 1 part super creamy, high fat mayonnaise.

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Maisie loves onions, but hates pickles, so I opted for the onion option.

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I used a squirt of regular yellow mustard, as I couldn’t find my dry powdered.

I added parsley for color (and also because my garden is currently overrun with flatleaf Italian parsley)

 

I used Sweet Gherkin juice, but any sweet pickle juice will do.

I sprinkled paprika on at the end for color.

The verdict by the other family members?

This is a definite keeper! It’s a little stronger flavored than my great-aunt’s, but that’s ok, we love strong flavors. I am not a fan of bland.

Aunt Susie Donoho Stokes’ Famous Deviled Eggs- 2018 Update

20 Hard boiled & peeled eggs

2 tsp of any sweet pickle juice

1/2 tsp mustard, to taste

1 small onion- chopped finely OR grated OR pulverized in food processor

1 tsp Worcestershire Sauce

2 tsp chopped fresh parsley

Paprika (I used Sweet Hungarian)


Cut eggs in half and put white on tray.

Either grate by hand or pulverize onion in food processor

Put yolks in bowl with all ingredients except the paprika.

Use a hand mixer or stick blender to blend well.

Fill plastic baggie or pastry bag with yellow filling.

Snip corner, if using plastic bag.

Pipe filling into the whites and garnish with paprika.

Makes 40 deviled egg halves


 

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VINTAGE RECIPE: My Great Aunt Ellen’s Chicken and Dumplings- MY NEW VERSION- Now w/saffron and truffle oil!!

Making this again for the first time since the original post in 2016- my nephew is here visiting from Palau and I wanted him to try the foods of his American ancestors 🙂

I added a new, modern twist to this recipe- a pinch of saffron and extra garlic in the chicken cooking water- and truffle oil to finish the thing off, to taste.

It’s incredible with the new umami flavor profiles! Photos below of my nephew rolling and cutting the dumplings- and the last batch of ‘sauce’

Miss Maisie and Me

TO SEE PART 1, CLICK HERE

My version

After I finished writing the last blog post, I started on the chicken and dumplings.

img_4133-1 The original version omits any thickener for sauce

right away I could tell that 2 tsp baking powder in one cup of flour was WAY too much- also, most recipes call for some form of fat, which I added.

Aunt Ellen used ‘chicken cooking water’ and canned broth. I decided to kill two birds with one stone and make my OWN broth.


CHICKEN AND BROTH:

2 packages of boneless skinless chicken breast (3 breasts per package)
a couple stalks of celery, leaves on, broken up in large chunks
a couple unpeeled carrots, broken up into large chunks
UNPEELED onion, cut in quarters.
water to cover
handful of fresh parsley (do not chop)
tablespoon of chicken bouillon

Basically, I just dumped it all in a pot on high-…

View original post 492 more words

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(Pictorial) Log Cabin Dollhouse- Miniature Polymer Clay Bread & Cheese Making

I spent a couple of days playing baker and cheesemonger, with varying results.

Polymer clay food miniatures are so fun to make for a foodie who is currently on a 10 day juice cleanse.

I need to go back to bread and cheesemaking at some point, but I quit after a couple of days because I now have way too many loaves of bread and cheeses in my possession.

My first attempts at baguette loaves were made with sculpey clay and colored with turmeric and eye shadow/mineral makeup. My dad actually painted them for me. They came out a bit overbaked, but it was a great first attempt.

My second attempts (and subsequent ones) were better, I still need to refine my bread painting skills.

I also ended up making Norwegian lefse sticks and bread. Lefse is like a potato based flat bread, similar to a huge tortilla, that has it’s origins during the Viking age. In my house, we make it around Christmas time, because my ex is Norwegian. I will do a separate post on the lefse tomorrow…

My first attempt at a blue cheese ended up looking like spinach artichoke dipped stuffed into bread instead- yumm

I ended up making blue cheeses, brie, swiss, garlic gouda, and herb covered chevre. Cheese making is fun, I will eventually get back to it again.

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VINTAGE RECIPE: My Great Aunt Ellen’s Chicken and Dumplings- MY VERSION!!

TO SEE PART 1, CLICK HERE

My version

After I finished writing the last blog post, I started on the chicken and dumplings.

img_4133-1

The original version omits any thickener for sauce

right away I could tell that 2 tsp baking powder in one cup of flour was WAY too much- also, most recipes call for some form of fat, which I added.

Aunt Ellen used ‘chicken cooking water’ and canned broth. I decided to kill two birds with one stone and make my OWN broth.


CHICKEN AND BROTH:

2 packages of boneless skinless chicken breast (3 breasts per package)
a couple stalks of celery, leaves on, broken up in large chunks
a couple unpeeled carrots, broken up into large chunks
UNPEELED onion, cut in quarters.
water to cover
handful of fresh parsley (do not chop)
tablespoon of chicken bouillon

Basically, I just dumped it all in a pot on high- when it reached a full boil, I covered it and let it cook on low for an hour.

After, I plucked chicken breasts out and chopped them into small pieces.

I strained the broth and discarded the solid vegetables.

Then, I measured out about 2 to 2.5 quarts of the broth for the ‘sauce’ later.

isn’t this beautiful?

 

Aunt Ellen’s granddaughter warned me to test out the recipe before totally committing, as her grandmother had different variations of the same recipe floating around. I immediately noticed that the baking powder to flour ration was WAY too high and would have resulted in a very bitter product. I increased the flour to 2 cups and decreased the baking powder to 1 tsp. I also added 1/3 cup of lard (or crisco), as it makes for a more tender dumpling and can be found in most chicken and dumpling recipes online. When I experimented WITHOUT the fat, it didn’t taste as good.

 


DUMPLINGS:

2 cups flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp chicken boullion
1 tsp baking powder
1/3 c lard or crisco
1 cup milk

(instructions are underneath photos)

first I rubbed the fat into the dry ingredients until it was kind of mealy

after, I added the milk and just mixed it all up with my hands. Next time I will use my stand mixer- I then made the dough into a smooth ball.

rolled it out- we liked the thicker ones- cut them into squares using pizza cutter

 

dumplings!

 

CHICKEN ‘SAUCE’ (GRAVY):

2 quarts of reserved chicken stock from boiling the chicken breasts
1.5 cups heavy cream
1 cup whole milk
1/2 cup flour
stick of butter
salt and pepper to taste
(optional: garlic powder, parsley, etc)

Melt stick of butter in pot over medium-high. Add flour and cook for a minute. Slowly add the cream and milk, a bit at a time, stirring until it becomes a white cream gravy. Add the 2 quarts of chicken stock and adjust seasoning. If you worry about lumps, use a stick blender or whisk while incorporating the broth. Return to a boil, stirring constantly.

When it begins bubbling again, add most of the dumplings and cover. Lower heat to low and cook about 12 minutes. Add rest of dumplings and cook uncovered on medium for about 20 minutes. Keep a close eye on it or it will boil over (like mine did).

Add chopped chicken and cover, set heat down to low, until warmed through.

it boiled over when I turned my back

 VERDICT:

This is definitely a keeper. I have to admit, I’ve never eaten real chicken and dumplings before. The only other exposure to it that I had was Pennsylvania Dutch Chicken Pot Pie and the stuff that comes out of a can (yuck). I was truly impressed with the delicate flavor.

I can see why my father loved it so much.

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VINTAGE RECIPE: My Great-Aunt Ellen Renfro’s Chicken and Dumplings

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Aunt Ellen Donoho Renfro and her sisters- she’s the second from left

UPDATE: TO SKIP AHEAD TO MY TWEAKED VERSION OF THE RECIPE, CLICK HERE

Aunt Ellen Renfro was my favorite great aunt. She was just the sweetest woman and best cook in our family.

My grandfather was her baby brother.

My dad is always going on about how wonderful his late Aunt Ellen’s chicken and dumplings were (and her bread and peach cobbler).

She’s been gone now for 29 years, so one would assume the recipes were lost forever- luckily, this week her granddaughter Vanessa was kind enough to send me photos of a few of her them! I am so thankful that she took the time out to scan these for me- I am also a little teary eyed (happily so) about the prospect of attempting these dishes.

Food is love, and memories, and family… this is definitely a tie to our collective pasts.

A bit about Ellen Donoho Renfro here:

http://image2.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=87300176

I have been cross referencing her dumpling recipe with others found on the Internet. It seems like her recipe omits the usual shortening and/or egg that many of the others have. Her sauce looks like a scaled down version of traditional Southern Chicken and Dumplings recipes.

I am going to attempt her ‘chicken sauce’ and dumplings today. I will test a batch of dumplings using her recipe- and make another batch using a dough that contains the usual shortening/egg and compare.

Since her sauce is a tad bland for my taste, right off the bat, I will likely doctor that a bit as well.

Will post the results later today or tomorrow- going off to cook now!