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(Pictorial) Log Cabin Dollhouse- Miniature Polymer Clay Norwegian Lefse Flat Bread, Sticks, and Griddle

We are doing a Norwegian (or Norwegian-American, IDK) themed dollhouse next.

Lefse griddle and lefse on the hearth of my new Norwegian Log Cabin dollhouse

#dollhouse #dollhousetour

A post shared by Miss Maisie (@missmaisiebabyfashionista) on

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(Pictorial) Log Cabin Dollhouse- Miniature Polymer Clay Bread & Cheese Making

I spent a couple of days playing baker and cheesemonger, with varying results.

Polymer clay food miniatures are so fun to make for a foodie who is currently on a 10 day juice cleanse.

I need to go back to bread and cheesemaking at some point, but I quit after a couple of days because I now have way too many loaves of bread and cheeses in my possession.

My first attempts at baguette loaves were made with sculpey clay and colored with turmeric and eye shadow/mineral makeup. My dad actually painted them for me. They came out a bit overbaked, but it was a great first attempt.

My second attempts (and subsequent ones) were better, I still need to refine my bread painting skills.

I also ended up making Norwegian lefse sticks and bread. Lefse is like a potato based flat bread, similar to a huge tortilla, that has it’s origins during the Viking age. In my house, we make it around Christmas time, because my ex is Norwegian. I will do a separate post on the lefse tomorrow…

My first attempt at a blue cheese ended up looking like spinach artichoke dipped stuffed into bread instead- yumm

I ended up making blue cheeses, brie, swiss, garlic gouda, and herb covered chevre. Cheese making is fun, I will eventually get back to it again.

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VINTAGE RECIPE: My Great Aunt Ellen’s Chicken and Dumplings- MY VERSION!!

TO SEE PART 1, CLICK HERE

My version

After I finished writing the last blog post, I started on the chicken and dumplings.

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The original version omits any thickener for sauce

right away I could tell that 2 tsp baking powder in one cup of flour was WAY too much- also, most recipes call for some form of fat, which I added.

Aunt Ellen used ‘chicken cooking water’ and canned broth. I decided to kill two birds with one stone and make my OWN broth.


CHICKEN AND BROTH:

2 packages of boneless skinless chicken breast (3 breasts per package)
a couple stalks of celery, leaves on, broken up in large chunks
a couple unpeeled carrots, broken up into large chunks
UNPEELED onion, cut in quarters.
water to cover
handful of fresh parsley (do not chop)
tablespoon of chicken bouillon

Basically, I just dumped it all in a pot on high- when it reached a full boil, I covered it and let it cook on low for an hour.

After, I plucked chicken breasts out and chopped them into small pieces.

I strained the broth and discarded the solid vegetables.

Then, I measured out about 2 to 2.5 quarts of the broth for the ‘sauce’ later.

isn’t this beautiful?

 

Aunt Ellen’s granddaughter warned me to test out the recipe before totally committing, as her grandmother had different variations of the same recipe floating around. I immediately noticed that the baking powder to flour ration was WAY too high and would have resulted in a very bitter product. I increased the flour to 2 cups and decreased the baking powder to 1 tsp. I also added 1/3 cup of lard (or crisco), as it makes for a more tender dumpling and can be found in most chicken and dumpling recipes online. When I experimented WITHOUT the fat, it didn’t taste as good.

 


DUMPLINGS:

2 cups flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp chicken boullion
1 tsp baking powder
1/3 c lard or crisco
1 cup milk

(instructions are underneath photos)

first I rubbed the fat into the dry ingredients until it was kind of mealy

after, I added the milk and just mixed it all up with my hands. Next time I will use my stand mixer- I then made the dough into a smooth ball.

rolled it out- we liked the thicker ones- cut them into squares using pizza cutter

 

dumplings!

 

CHICKEN ‘SAUCE’ (GRAVY):

2 quarts of reserved chicken stock from boiling the chicken breasts
1.5 cups heavy cream
1 cup whole milk
1/2 cup flour
stick of butter
salt and pepper to taste
(optional: garlic powder, parsley, etc)

Melt stick of butter in pot over medium-high. Add flour and cook for a minute. Slowly add the cream and milk, a bit at a time, stirring until it becomes a white cream gravy. Add the 2 quarts of chicken stock and adjust seasoning. If you worry about lumps, use a stick blender or whisk while incorporating the broth. Return to a boil, stirring constantly.

When it begins bubbling again, add most of the dumplings and cover. Lower heat to low and cook about 12 minutes. Add rest of dumplings and cook uncovered on medium for about 20 minutes. Keep a close eye on it or it will boil over (like mine did).

Add chopped chicken and cover, set heat down to low, until warmed through.

it boiled over when I turned my back

 VERDICT:

This is definitely a keeper. I have to admit, I’ve never eaten real chicken and dumplings before. The only other exposure to it that I had was Pennsylvania Dutch Chicken Pot Pie and the stuff that comes out of a can (yuck). I was truly impressed with the delicate flavor.

I can see why my father loved it so much.

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More Truffle Madness: Black Truffle Scrambled Eggs…


This breakfast (Maisie and I shared) was made entirely with jarred black European truffles.

Super simple- toasted bagels with black truffle butter and scrambled eggs with black truffles.

I made the truffle butter by mixing half a stick of unsalted butter with quarter of a stick of salted butter and added a tsp of the minced black truffle.

Absolute HEAVEN!

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Truffle Pasta- 3rd Attempt for my parents

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The third time’s a charm- found a nice egg pasta- FINALLY- that was perfect for this dish.

It was Delallo Egg Fettuccine… the noodles were tender and delicate. They were the perfect foil for the truffle/cream/parm sauce…

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best egg pasta I could find locally

Maisie and her ever-present piggie handbag- on our pasta hunt

My folks enjoyed their pasta and truffles… after this, I had a huge white truffle left to use up and I suddenly found myself sick to death of pasta.

my dad and his plate full of truffle-liciousness

 

 

 

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Oregon White Truffle Pasta

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wide egg noodles with Oregon white truffles

 

The Oregon white truffle is a strange thing:

Raw, it is VERY strong and pungent- however, once warmed lightly in a pan of butter for a few moments, it mellows out to a more agreeable and subtly luscious form.

My second experiment was a pasta dish. It was a huge hit with everyone, even the truffle hating Man.

I read somewhere that Oregon white truffles should be treated more like the European black ones- slightly warmed so that their true flavor shines through (and to temper the sharpness that they have when raw).

I threw a knob of butter in a pan and warmed it over low heat- then added shaved truffle slices- HEAVEN!

It completely changed the flavor profile.

While the truffles were warming, I boiled the noodles. I asked R to buy pappardelle, but he brought homemade German wide egg noodles back instead by mistake. It wasn’t a bad substitute and actually tasted better than the last batch of pappardelle noodles I bought.

I drained the cooked noodles, threw them back in the pot- added a splash of heavy cream, a small handful of good parmesan, the truffle-infused butter… omg! PERFECTION!

I shaved more raw truffle over my plate when serving and LOVED the contrast between the cooked and raw flavors.

R isn’t pleased with the pasta quality, so today we are going to hunt for better quality noodles for today’s batch (I am making some for my parents).

 
These things are starting to really grow on me…