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VINTAGE RECIPE: My Great Aunt Susie’s Deviled Eggs Recipe! (My 2018 Updated Version)

deviled eggs Aunt Susie's

In my effort to chronicle my paternal great-aunts’ best recipes, I have another that I want to experiment with. All of these lovely women have since passed away- and even my health is in question currently- so it just feels like the right thing to do.

To put it in perspective, my grandfather was born 100 yrs ago this year, to me, it’s imperative to write these things down before they get lost to future generations.

This recipe was given to me by my cousins Jeremy and Meleta- Aunt Susie was his grandmother.

A zillion thanks to you guys-I love you!

Today, I will attempt Susie Donoho Stoke’s family-famous deviled eggs:

I cheated and bought pre boiled/peeled eggs, because it’s Thanksgiving tomorrow and I already have too much to do.

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I used Miracle Whip, because I remember my grandmother and aunts using this instead of mayo, except I did a ratio of 3 part MW to 1 part super creamy, high fat mayonnaise.

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Maisie loves onions, but hates pickles, so I opted for the onion option.

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I used a squirt of regular yellow mustard, as I couldn’t find my dry powdered.

I added parsley for color (and also because my garden is currently overrun with flatleaf Italian parsley)

 

I used Sweet Gherkin juice, but any sweet pickle juice will do.

I sprinkled paprika on at the end for color.

The verdict by the other family members?

This is a definite keeper! It’s a little stronger flavored than my great-aunt’s, but that’s ok, we love strong flavors. I am not a fan of bland.

Aunt Susie Donoho Stokes’ Famous Deviled Eggs- 2018 Update

20 Hard boiled & peeled eggs

2 tsp of any sweet pickle juice

1/2 tsp mustard, to taste

1 small onion- chopped finely OR grated OR pulverized in food processor

1 tsp Worcestershire Sauce

2 tsp chopped fresh parsley

Paprika (I used Sweet Hungarian)


Cut eggs in half and put white on tray.

Either grate by hand or pulverize onion in food processor

Put yolks in bowl with all ingredients except the paprika.

Use a hand mixer or stick blender to blend well.

Fill plastic baggie or pastry bag with yellow filling.

Snip corner, if using plastic bag.

Pipe filling into the whites and garnish with paprika.

Makes 40 deviled egg halves


 

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VINTAGE RECIPE: My Great Aunt Ellen’s Chicken and Dumplings- MY VERSION!!

TO SEE PART 1, CLICK HERE

My version

After I finished writing the last blog post, I started on the chicken and dumplings.

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The original version omits any thickener for sauce

right away I could tell that 2 tsp baking powder in one cup of flour was WAY too much- also, most recipes call for some form of fat, which I added.

Aunt Ellen used ‘chicken cooking water’ and canned broth. I decided to kill two birds with one stone and make my OWN broth.


CHICKEN AND BROTH:

2 packages of boneless skinless chicken breast (3 breasts per package)
a couple stalks of celery, leaves on, broken up in large chunks
a couple unpeeled carrots, broken up into large chunks
UNPEELED onion, cut in quarters.
water to cover
handful of fresh parsley (do not chop)
tablespoon of chicken bouillon

Basically, I just dumped it all in a pot on high- when it reached a full boil, I covered it and let it cook on low for an hour.

After, I plucked chicken breasts out and chopped them into small pieces.

I strained the broth and discarded the solid vegetables.

Then, I measured out about 2 to 2.5 quarts of the broth for the ‘sauce’ later.

isn’t this beautiful?

 

Aunt Ellen’s granddaughter warned me to test out the recipe before totally committing, as her grandmother had different variations of the same recipe floating around. I immediately noticed that the baking powder to flour ration was WAY too high and would have resulted in a very bitter product. I increased the flour to 2 cups and decreased the baking powder to 1 tsp. I also added 1/3 cup of lard (or crisco), as it makes for a more tender dumpling and can be found in most chicken and dumpling recipes online. When I experimented WITHOUT the fat, it didn’t taste as good.

 


DUMPLINGS:

2 cups flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp chicken boullion
1 tsp baking powder
1/3 c lard or crisco
1 cup milk

(instructions are underneath photos)

first I rubbed the fat into the dry ingredients until it was kind of mealy

after, I added the milk and just mixed it all up with my hands. Next time I will use my stand mixer- I then made the dough into a smooth ball.

rolled it out- we liked the thicker ones- cut them into squares using pizza cutter

 

dumplings!

 

CHICKEN ‘SAUCE’ (GRAVY):

2 quarts of reserved chicken stock from boiling the chicken breasts
1.5 cups heavy cream
1 cup whole milk
1/2 cup flour
stick of butter
salt and pepper to taste
(optional: garlic powder, parsley, etc)

Melt stick of butter in pot over medium-high. Add flour and cook for a minute. Slowly add the cream and milk, a bit at a time, stirring until it becomes a white cream gravy. Add the 2 quarts of chicken stock and adjust seasoning. If you worry about lumps, use a stick blender or whisk while incorporating the broth. Return to a boil, stirring constantly.

When it begins bubbling again, add most of the dumplings and cover. Lower heat to low and cook about 12 minutes. Add rest of dumplings and cook uncovered on medium for about 20 minutes. Keep a close eye on it or it will boil over (like mine did).

Add chopped chicken and cover, set heat down to low, until warmed through.

it boiled over when I turned my back

 VERDICT:

This is definitely a keeper. I have to admit, I’ve never eaten real chicken and dumplings before. The only other exposure to it that I had was Pennsylvania Dutch Chicken Pot Pie and the stuff that comes out of a can (yuck). I was truly impressed with the delicate flavor.

I can see why my father loved it so much.

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In Search of Chess Pie… has anyone heard of or eaten it?

this looks very similar to my grandfather's pie- except his filling was almost translucent

this looks very similar to my grandfather’s pie- except his filling was almost translucent

My grandpa has been gone for nearly 20 yrs now. I was the first grandchild (at least, the first ‘official’ one) and raised primarily in my grandparents’ home until my grandmother passed away. I always associate food, Hee Haw, and those Barrel of Monkeys games with him.

Photo of baby me and my grandpa, a lifetime ago

Photo of baby me and my grandpa, a lifetime ago- I looked very much like Maisie does now.

The food part is easy- he was who fed me as a baby. He was proud of the fact that my pudgy baby self could “eat as much as grandpaw”- which was back when being a ‘good eater’ was something to be proud of.

The Barrel of Monkeys thing was from the little plastic monkeys my aunts had that I would drop down the sides of his recliner so that he would make them ‘talk’ for me.

Hee Haw was a country music television show my grandparents ALWAYS watched.

I realized tonight, while talking to my cousin, that we all have such different memories (and some of my cousins have no memories at all of him) of our grandfather. To my cousin Josh, he meant Okinawan WW2 stories and exciting things. To me it was food… and chess pie.

When I was about 12, more or less, he divorced one of his ex-wives that he married after my grandmother passed (I don’t recall which one) and moved into a rental next door to our farm for a while. He used to bake these delicious pies that I LOVED and begged him to teach me how. They were like a less sweet version of the insides a pecan pie or a tarte au sucre… butter, almost custard-y, and SO simple to make.

I have never heard of anyone else eating or making chess pies- before or since- and I only thought of this memory tonight, after having stored it away for decades.

According to Wikepedia:

“History

According to James Beard’s American Cookery (1972), chess pie was brought from England originally and was found in New England as well as Virginia. The origin of the name chess pie may have come from the term “pie chest”, another name for a pie safe.[1]

Composition

Recipes vary, but are generally similar in that they call for the preparation of a single crust and a filling composed of eggs,butter, granulated sugar, brown sugar, and vanilla. What sets chess pie apart from many other custard pies is the addition of cornmeal. Some recipes also call for corn syrup, which tends to create a more gelatinous consistency. The pie is then baked. The finished product is often consumed with coffee.[citation needed]

Similar pies

Chess pie is closely related to vinegar pie, and the two terms are often used interchangeably. Vinegar pie generally adds somewhere between a teaspoonful andtablespoonful of vinegar to the above ingredients to reduce the sweetness. Some variations are called Jeff Davis or Jefferson Davis Pie, and Kentucky pie. Buttermilk pie is similar to both of these, using buttermilk for souring instead of vinegar, but without cornmeal.

Although preparation of a pecan pie is similar (with the obvious addition of pecans), pecan pies usually contain corn syrup.

Lemon chess pie is a form of chess pie made with lemon juice that is popular in the Southern United States.”

I don’t recall my grandfather’s version having much more than oil/butter, sugar, and eggs in it.

What’s Cooking America  includes 2 recipes from the 18th and 19th centuries:

Mid 1700s – From the cookbook Martha Washington’s Booke of Cookery, transcribed by Karen Hess:

To make very good cheesecakes without] cheese curd
Take a quart of cream, & when it boyles take 14 eggs; If they be very yallow take out 2 or 3 of the youlks; put them into [the] cream when it boyles & keep it with continuall stirring till it be thick like curd. [Then] put into it sugar & currans, of each halfe a pound; ye currans must first be plumpt in faire water; then take a pound of butter & put into the curd a quarter of [that] butter; [then] take a quart of fine flowre, & put [the] resto of [the] butter to it in little bits, with 4 or 5 spoonsfulls of faire water, make [the] paste of it & when it is well mingled beat it on a table & soe roule it out.. Then put [the] curd into [the] paste, first putting therein 2 nutmeggs slyced, a little salt, & a little rosewater; [the] eggs must be well beaten before you put them in; & for [your] paste you may make them up into what fashion you please…”


1877
– Estelle Woods Wilcox’s 1877 cookbook called Buckeye Cookery, she includes a recipe for Chess Pie:

Chess Pie
Three eggs, two-thirds cup sugar, half cup butter (half cup milk may be added if not wanted so rich); beat butter to a cream, than add yolks and sugar beaten to a froth with the flavoring; stir all together rapidly, and bake in a nice crust. When done, spread with the beaten whites, and three table-spoons sugar and a little flavoring. Return to oven and brown slightly. this makes one pie, which should be served immediately.
– Miss J. Carson, Glendale.

The 1877 recipe is VERY similar to what I remember my grandfather baking- except I think he used cooking oil and omitted the meringue topping.

At some point I will ask around to see if anyone still has his recipe for it. I haven’t made this dessert since I was a teenager, but now I am very curious.

Have any of you heard of Chess Pie?