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What You Need to Know About Soybean Oil—and How It’s Sabotaging Your Diet

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Soybeans on spoon Michael Grayson/Getty

We’ve heard time and time again that sugar—in any form—is the enemy when it comes to health and weight-loss. But it turns out that there might be something just a bit worse for us: soybean oil.

Soybean represents 60 percent of oils used in food today (truly!) and a recent study—in mice—found that a soybean oil-enriched diet caused nearly 25 percent more weight gain than a coconut oil-enriched diet. It also caused nine percent more weight gain than a fructose-enriched diet (which is the sugar found in fruits). To boot, mice that were fed the soybean diet also had liver issues and a higher insulin resistance. Basically, it’s bad news all around.

So, what to do with this (kinda scary) new info? We turned to the experts for their insight on why soybean oil should be avoided and how to be sure you don’t eat it.

Why…

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The science of ‘hangry:’ Why some people get grumpy when they’re hungry

A man expresses disapproval at his friend's table manners as she sinks her teeth greedily into a sandwich, circa 1940.

A man expresses disapproval at his friend’s table manners as she sinks her teeth greedily into a sandwich, circa 1940.

(CNN)Have you ever snapped angrily at someone when you were hungry? Or has someone snapped angrily at you when they were hungry? If so, you’ve experienced “hangry” (an amalgam of hungry and angry) — the phenomenon whereby some people get grumpy and short-tempered when they’re overdue for a feed.

But where does hanger come from? And why is it that only some people seem to get hangry? The answer lies in some of the processes that happen inside your body when it needs food.

The physiology of hanger

The carbohydrates, proteins and fats in everything you eat are digested into simple sugars (such as glucose), amino acids and free fatty acids. These nutrients pass into your bloodstream from where they are distributed to your organs and tissues and used for energy.

As time passes after your last meal, the amount of these nutrients circulating in your bloodstream starts to drop. If your blood-glucose levels fall far enough, your brain will perceive it as a life-threatening situation. You see, unlike most other organs and tissues in your body which can use a variety of nutrients to keep functioning, your brain is critically dependent on glucose to do its job.

You’ve probably already noticed this dependence your brain has on glucose; simple things can become difficult when you’re hungry and your blood glucose levels drop. You may find it hard to concentrate, for instance, or you may make silly mistakes. Or you might have noticed that your words become muddled or slurred.

Another thing that can become more difficult when you’re hungry is behaving within socially acceptable norms, such as not snapping at people. So while you may be able to conjure up enough brain power to avoid being grumpy with important colleagues, you may let your guard down and inadvertently snap at the people you are most relaxed with or care most about, such as partners and friends. Sound familiar?

READ MORE AT: http://www.cnn.com/2015/07/20/health/science-behind-being-hangry/index.html?sr=fb072215hangry5pStoryLink

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Bacon Flavored Seaweed Is The New Kale

I could totally dig this. When I lived in Canada in my late teens/early 20s, I was introduced to the wonders of dulse by my neighbor, who was from New Brunswick.

dulse-cooked-ss
Bacon-flavored seaweed is the new kale. Yes, really.

Scientists are currently cultivating a marine plant that’s packed with more nutrients than the trendy green superfood kale. And it naturally tastes like bacon.

Bacon-flavored crackers. Bacon-flavored salad dressing. These are just two of the savory treats that have been created so far using the domesticated strain of dulse (Palmaria palmata), a kind of red algae, or seaweed, that typically grows in the waters along northern Pacific and Atlantic coastlines. [Science You Can Eat: 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Food]

Dulse is usually harvested in the wild, dried out and then sold for up to $90 a pound, according to researchers at the Oregon State University (OSU) Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, Oregon, who developed the domesticated strain of the plant.

The OSU researchers are working on making dulse more affordable and more widely available. Their strain of the lettucelike marine plant can be cultivated using hydroponic farming methods in which the plants are grow in water, without any soil. These methods make dulse much easier to grow and harvest, and therefore more affordable. The researchers are currently producing about 20 to 30 lbs. (9 to 14 kilograms) of this fast-growing plant each week in two large, water-filled tanks at the Hatfield Marine Science Center.
However, Chris Langdon, a professor of fisheries at OSU who is leading the seaweed-farming effort, said that he and his colleagues can amp up production of the delicious plant to 100 lbs. (45 kg) a week. Langdon has been growing dulse for 15 years, but he and his fellow researchers only recently patented their novel strain of bacon-flavored seaweed.

The researchers originally started growing the plant as a food for abalone, a kind of large, edible mollusk that’s often raised in commercial “aquaculture” farms. An excellent source of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and protein, dulse is the perfect food for farm-raised abalone, Langdon said.

“The original goal was to create a superfood for abalone, because high-quality abalone is treasured, especially in Asia. We were able to grow dulse-fed abalone at rates that exceeded those previously reported in the literature,” Langdon said in a statement.

But the researchers recently shifted their focus from feeding abalone to feeding humans. When Chuck Toombs, an instructor in OSU’s business department, stopped by Langdon’s office for a visit, he saw the tanks of seaweed growing outside Langdon’s door. Toombs had come to ask the fisheries professor if he had any ideas for business projects for students. Clearly, the appeal of a bacon-flavored health food was not lost on Toombs.

read more at http://www.livescience.com/51588-bacon-flavored-seaweed-dulse.html?cmpid=514627_20150716_49284796&adbid=10152875098691761&adbpl=fb&adbpr=30478646760
 

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New Alzheimer’s treatment fully restores memory function

This article is of particular interest to me because my mother has dementia.  I live with the fear of developing this horrible disease myself.

 

New Alzheimer’s treatment fully restores memory function

Of the mice that received the treatment, 75 percent got their memory function back.

Australian researchers have come up with a non-invasive ultrasound technology that clears the brain of neurotoxic amyloid plaques – structures that are responsible for memory loss and a decline in cognitive function in Alzheimer’s patients.

If a person has Alzheimer’s disease, it’s usually the result of a build-up of two types of lesions – amyloid plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles. Amyloid plaques sit between the neurons and end up as dense clusters of beta-amyloid molecules, a sticky type of protein that clumps together and forms plaques.

Read the rest of the article here:
http://www.sciencealert.com/new-alzheimer-s-treatment-fully-restores-memory-function