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(Pictorial) Log Cabin Dollhouse- Building rope/trundle beds

We started building and designing period furnishings for this cabin.

Historically, a cabin this size would have housed (on average) a family or up to 11 or more!!!

Trundle rope beds were in order… a single sized bed like that could have slept (I’m not kidding) 2 grown people or quite a few children!

I made all of the bedding out of vintage linens and stuffed it with ‘straw’ (actually, tea leaves).

We tried our hand at a stool with a woven rope seat, but cut it wrong (too tall) and now it is a side table.

I also made a teeny ‘fire’ for the fireplace

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Queen Nefertiti’s Tomb Found: Has the tomb of Tutankhamun’s mother been found hiding in plain sight?

Queen Nefertiti: Has the tomb of Tutankhamun’s mother been found hiding in plain sight?

Queen Nefertiti has fascinated and perplexed ancient Egyptian scholars in equal measure.

The legendary beauty ruled alongside Pharaoh Akhenaten in 14BC. During her reign she accrued status as an icon of power and elegance.

Despite her prominence in ancient Egyptian history, her resting place has remained a mystery – but now a new theory by a leading historian claims to have finally found the Queen’s burial place.A diagram of Nefertiti's possible resting place. Two secret doorways may exist coming from the walls of the main chamber.A diagram of Nefertiti’s possible resting place. Two secret doorways may exist coming from the walls of the main chamber.

Nicholas Reeves, an archaeologist at the University of Arizona, has made bold new claims that he believes she has been laid to rest in Tutankhamun’s burial chamber. The pharaoh’s tomb was found fully intact and untouched by explorer Howard Carter in 1922.

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It remains the only ever pharaoh’s tomb to be found intact and has proved a treasure trove for historians and archaeologists.The bust of Egyptian beauty Queen Nefertiti is on display at Neues Museum on September 10, 2014 in Berlin, Germany.The bust of Egyptian beauty Queen Nefertiti is on display at Neues Museum in Berlin, Germany.

Over 5,000 artefacts were found in the tomb including chariots, musical instruments and clothes.

Now Mr Reeves believes that the tomb may have one more secret to yield and has claimed that Nefertiti’s resting site may also lie within its walls.The body known as “younger lady” is suspected to be Nefertiti, if proven it could also place her as the mother to Tutankhamun as the mummy is the biological mother of the boy king. This is a possibility as the Queen was the cousin of Tut’s father

After examining high resolution images from inside the tomb, Mr Reeves believes that two secret passage ways exist which have been covered up but can be faintly seen through cracks and fissures.

In a recently published paper, called The Burial of Nefertiti?,  he sets out his belief that one passage could contain a mundane store room, but another could lead to Nefertiti’s tomb.

Speaking to The Economist about his new theory, he said: “If I’m wrong, I’m wrong; but if I’m right this is potentially the biggest archaeological discovery ever made.”

Read more at: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/archaeology/news/queen-nefertiti-has-the-tomb-of-tutankhamuns-mother-been-found-hiding-in-plain-sight-10449342.html

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Today’s Experiment: Making Homemade Ricotta Cheese and a Little Ricotta History…

A friend posted a recipe for homemade ricotta cheese on her Facebook wall last night and raved about how easy it was, so I decided to try it myself.  I didn’t use the recipe she posted, because I didn’t have all the ingredients listed.

I used this recipe from Ina Garten instead and it turned out wonderfully. It was better than any store bought ricotta I’ve ever eaten.  It was one of the easiest ‘fancy’ recipes I’ve ever used.  I feel inspired to try out other cheese making techniques next.

Maisie enjoyed licking the excess cheese off the cheesecloth when I was finished.

I will be using it for a zucchini pasta recipe tomorrow.

Now, a little bit about the history of ricotta cheese from Clifford Wright’s website:

    Two of the earliest mentions or depictions of ricotta are related to Sicily. Professor Santi Correnti, chairman of the history department of the University of Catania and a preeminent historian of Sicily, writes that during the reign of the Sicilian king Frederick II, in the early thirteenth century, the king and his hunting party came across the hut of a dairy farmer making ricotta and, being ravenous, asked for some. Frederick pulled out his bread loaf, poured the hot ricotta and whey on top and advised his retinue thatcu’ non mancia ccu’ so’ cucchiaru lassa tutto ‘o zammataru (Those who don’t eat with a spoon will leave all their ricotta behind).

    The first depiction of the making of ricotta is an illustration in the medical treatise known as theTacuinum sanitatis (medieval health handbook), the Latin translation of the Arab physician Ibn Butlan’s eleventh century Taqwim al-sihha.

    Ortensio Lando in his Commentario delle piu notabili e mostruose cose d’Italia published in 1548 has his fictional traveler go to Val Calci, at some distance from Pisa, for the best ricotta in the world.

boiling the milk, cream, vinegar, and salt

straining the curds through moistened cheesecloth

after about a half hour, this is what it looked like.

Homemade ricotta! I can’t believe how incredibly easy it was! After this photo was snapped, I wrapped the entire thing in cling film.