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Science Skirt & Bow Photos! (Instagram)

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I think this is my favorite fabric to date! It is adorable and has the requisite twirl factor that Maisie demands.

Honestly, I doubt I will ever buy her another skirt again, when I can churn these out daily.

The quality of my homesewn and designed skirts are far superior to the ones I can buy at the store. I don’t skimp on materials, everything is lined, it’s just amazingly easy for me to do this… and it teaches her how to sew, to boot!

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Humans Think Using The Brain’s Navigation System, Reveals New Study (link)

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“How do humans think? This is one of the most intriguing questions that has captivated neuroscientists for decades. And not long ago, it seemed like something that no one would ever find an answer to.

But, a team at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) in Leipzig, Germany, and the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience in Trondheim, Norway have come up with a conclusive answer that humans think using the brain’s navigation system. The results of the finding have been published in the journal Science.”

Wish I knew how to press this, but sharing it instead:

https://sparkonit.com/2018/11/12/humans-think-using-brains-navigation-system/

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Maisie’s Sick In Bed YouTube Science Videos

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My poor little monkey woke up with a stomach bug. She’s rarely sick, knock wood- and refused to believe there was anything wrong with herself.

She DID have time this morning to want to make math and science vids from her 4 yr old perspective.

#1 tells the difference between googol and Google:

#2 is kind of all about the tastebuds of the tongue…

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She’s so cute, even when she’s not feeling well! ❤

 

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(Videos) Maisie’s Science Corner: She Explains How We Hear & How Planes Fly

Four year old Maisie explains “The Bones of the Middle Ear and How We Hear” (and yes, she needs her hair brushed):

And, in this one, she tries to explain how airplanes fly:

I think my kid is stinking cute, super smart, though her English could use some improving (we’re multilingual)- and that EVERY PARENT/HUMAN should watch or let their kids watch Storybots on Netflix. She adores this show and learns SO much.

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The Decline of My Kishkes, or Retroverted Uteruses & Reproductive Health Scares Part I

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I have a tipped/tilted/retroverted uterus and it can be annoying, to put it mildly

WARNING: THIS POST MAY CONTAIN GRAPHIC AND/OR HILARIOUSLY DISGUSTING DESCRIPTIONS OF DOCTOR’S VISITS, BIOPSIES, RETROVERTED UTERINE ISSUES, AND ADENOMYOSIS/CYSTIC OVARY SYMPTOMS. IF YOU CAN’T BEAR TO READ STUFF LIKE THIS- SPOILER ALERT- GO AWAY NOW.

“Pet Peeve #545:

When ALL your specialists and primary care doctor feel your issues are gynecological, yet your male gyno thinks everyone is wrong and refuses to listen to you OR EVEN TEST YOU until you stick a proverbial foot way up his ass”

This blog started out primarily because of my freakish reproductive system (hint, Maisie).

It is only fitting that I update the trials and tribulations of my nearly 50 year old reproductive organs.

Let me preface this by saying, I am not in menopause and my body doesn’t seem to know it is a-coming. My menstrual cycle is consistently 28-30 days.

I also was born with a retroverted/tilted/ass backwards uterus. Such conditions can worsen over time from childbirth or other uterine issues.


According to Wikipedia, it is defined as:

A retroverted uterus (tilted uterus, tipped uterus) is a uterus that is tilted posteriorly. This is in contrast to the slightly “anteverted” uterus that most women have, which is tipped forward toward the bladder, with the anterior end slightly concave.”

“Tilted posteriorly” means tilted towards your ASS, ie, posterior. Mine is particularly tilted waaaay back, which makes basic bodily functions more difficult over time- more gross details to follow later.

Oddly, I started having some very strange symptoms that became progressively worse in the years after Maisie was born. I went to specialist after specialist to no avail. Gastro docs, urologists, nephrologists, rheumatologists, gynecologists, pain specialists who simply wanted to get me hooked on pain pills, which I refused- nobody could figure out what the hell was wrong with me.

I had lower back pains and kidney infections that did not start out as urinary tract infections- and I’ve never really had bladder infections prior to this, though I’ve had kidney stones before. They kept coming back, no antibiotic seemed to help. My doctor sent me to every specialist she could think of. My bowels stopped working regularly. I had to take massive stool softeners and even that didn’t always help. 

Everything, every test came back normal. I was starting to feel like I was losing my mind, but I KNEW something was wrong.

(for my rant on what I pay for my crazy expensive healthcare insurance, go here)

I KNOW my body and I am pretty much a health nut. I live a Ketogenic lifestyle. I rarely drink and never have been much of a drinker. I don’t ‘party’. I love to cook healthy meals. I work out a lot- I am a FitBit freak and try to get at least 10k-20k steps a day, mostly for the endorphins. The few prescriptions meds I must take, for high blood pressure (another genetic pain in the ass) and GERD, I do religiously. I don’t have depression.

I mean, I HAVE to take care of my health. I had a baby at 45.5 and I want to live to see her grow up. There can be NO room for error at this point. My child needs me to be healthy.

In mid-December 2017, my primary care physician ordered an ultrasound of my pelvic region. The results were complex septated cysts in my left ovary, thickening in my uterus, etc. Complex septated cysts are considered a bit more dangerous than regular ones.

My paternal grandmother died of ovarian cancer at my exact age. Her daughters and one son all carry the BRCA1 mutation. 3 out of the 4 girls had BRCA1 breast cancer. My father was fortunate- he was the only child out of 6 to not have the mutation. Unfortunately, even though I am not a carrier, this still increases my own chances of gynecological cancers.

A MRI was recommended as a follow up. Because we couldn’t get the MRI approved by the insurance company, we had to go with a 6 week follow up ultrasound.

On top of this, I take care of my family- and I mean everyone, including extended family. I am the medical POA for many and the patient advocate for the rest.

I spent months in San Diego this year (and the end of 2017) sleeping in a trauma unit with a family member who was in a catastrophic motorcycle accident- and taking care of them once they were discharged. I only came back to Michigan because of my own health issues.

While in Encinitas, CA, I had my follow up ultrasound at Scripps hospital. It showed no change in the cyst size, but my uterus was getting larger, with new polyps and fibroids and thickening of the uterine walls.

Armed with this info, I sent the ultrasound results to my primary doctor in Michigan. She felt it was urgent that I come home and get this checked out, since my ‘fancy’ insurance didn’t work in the state of California and my pain and symptoms were worsening by the day.

We set up an appointment for March with a gynecologist and I forwarded all of the info from CA to his office a month ahead of time.

I planned for fly back home to MI in March for my scheduled appointments and be back in CA to take care of my family member after the appointments, as they still could not care for themselves.

It didn’t work out this way.

Little did I know, there was going to be a fight on my hands just to get my MRI and to be taken seriously, as his staff did not put the 2nd ultrasound in my chart…

(to be continued in part 2 with the discovery of adenomyosis, cancer biopsies and testing, and my journey towards hysterectomy)


 

 

 

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Fact: Having More Friends in Your 20’s Can Make You Live Longer

I had a ton of wonderful friends in my 20s, but most of them have died in the last 5-6 yrs and I find myself making new friends now- who are IN THEIR 20s mostly- SO WEIRD!

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2015 Billboard Music AwardsPhoto: WENN

Here’s some good news for Taylor Swift and her squad today: New research reveals that having strong friendships in your 20s can actually help you to live longer.

The 30-year study from the University of Rochester found that having more social interactions throughout your third decade of life is important to health later on, while in your 30s it is the quality of friendship that contributes to a longer life.

Researchers explained that frequent social interactions at age 20 are key to help us to figure out who we are. “It’s often around this age that we meet people from diverse backgrounds, with opinions and values that are different from our own, and we learn how to best manage those differences,” the study’s lead author Cheryl Carmichael said.

MORE: How to Let a Guy Know You Want to Be More Than Friends

However, at age 30, the study participants who had intimate, high-quality friendships reported the highest…

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16 Reasons You Should Be Having More Sex, According to Science

Science lies.

It doesn’t count as exercise unless you’re hanging off a freaking trapeze or jumping on a trampoline while doing it (bahahaha- “TRAMPoline”)

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Reason #8: Sex makes you look younger. Reason #8: Sex makes you look younger.

Guys, here’s a little secret: Sex is good for more than your relationship. In fact, according to science, getting busy on the regular can benefit your overall health—and your guy’s, too—in some pretty major ways.

In the spirit of empowering ladies everywhere to get it on as much as they can, we’ve compiled a list of 16 medially-proven reasons you should be having more sex.

MORE: The Best Relationship Advice You’ll Ever Read

1. Moderate sex can cure a cold
Not only does sex make you more content in your relationship, but it also keeps you healthier. In 1999, researchers at Wilkes University in Wilkes-Barre Pennsylvania found that college students who had sex once or twice a week had higher levels of a certain antibody that provided a boost to their immune systems, compared to students who had sex less—or more—often.

2. Sex lowers your blood…

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Speaking more than one language makes you smarter: Bilingual people have more grey matter than those who only know their mother tongue

Maisie already knows English and Persian and a bit of Tagalog (Filipino).  I have one person in the house who has exclusively spoken Farsi (Persian) to her since she was 4 months old. She can respond/answer in both languages interchangeably. My mother and I add a few Filipino words here and there…

It’s official! Speaking more than one language makes you smarter: Bilingual people have more grey matter than those who only know their mother tongue

  • Being bilingual increases the grey matter in certain parts of the brain
  • This difference is not present if the other language known is sign language
  • Management of two spoken languages leads to cognitive advantages 

People who speak two or more languages have more grey matter in certain parts of their brain, a study has found.

But this difference is not present if the other language known is sign language.

Scientists found that being bilingual increases the size of the part of the brain responsible for attention span and short term memory.

A study by Georgetown University Medical Centre found adults who are polyglots have more grey matter, shown above in blue, but those who used sign language did not (file image)

A study by Georgetown University Medical Centre found adults who are polyglots have more grey matter, shown above in blue, but those who used sign language did not (file image)

In the past it had been thought children who spoke two languages could have been at a disadvantage because the presence of two vocabularies would lead to delayed language development.

But recent research has found they perform better on tasks that require attention, inhibition and short-term memory – collectively termed ‘executive control’ – than their monolingual peers.

Yet controversy still surrounded whether there was a ‘bilingual advantage’, because these differences were not observed in all studies.

Now a study by Georgetown University Medical Centre in Washington DC has found adults who are polyglots have more grey matter, but those who use sign language do not.

The management of two spoken languages, rather than simply a larger vocabulary observed in practitioners of sign language, improved cognitive performance. Above, a mother and child practice signing (file image) 

The management of two spoken languages, rather than simply a larger vocabulary observed in practitioners of sign language, improved cognitive performance. Above, a mother and child practice signing (file image)

It adds to a growing understanding of how long-term experience with a particular skill – in this case management of two languages – changes the brain.

Dr Guinevere Eden said: ‘Inconsistencies in the reports about the bilingual advantage stem primarily from the variety of tasks that are used in attempts to elicit the advantage.

‘Given this concern, we took a different approach and instead compared grey matter volume between adult bilinguals and monolinguals.

‘We reasoned that the experience with two languages and the increased need for cognitive control to use them appropriately would result in brain changes in Spanish-English bilinguals when compared with English-speaking monolinguals.

‘And in fact greater grey matter for bilinguals was observed in frontal and parietal brain regions that are involved in executive control.’

The study, published in the journal Cerebral Cortex, explored why differences in grey matter are based on experiences.

Dr Olumide Olulade said: ‘Our aim was to address whether the constant management of two spoken languages leads to cognitive advantages and the larger grey matter we observed in Spanish-English bilinguals, or whether other aspects of being bilingual, such as the large vocabulary associated with having two languages, could account for this.’

Researchers compared the grey matter in bilinguals of both American Sign Language (ASL) and spoken English, with that of monolingual users of English.

Both ASL-English and Spanish-English bilinguals share qualities associated with bilingualism, such as vocabulary size.

Unlike bilinguals of two spoken languages, ASL-English bilinguals can sign and speak simultaneously, allowing the researchers to test whether the need to inhibit the other language might explain the bilingual advantage.

Dr Olulade added: ‘Unlike the findings for the Spanish-English bilinguals, we found no evidence for greater grey matter in the ASL-English bilinguals.

‘Thus we conclude that the management of two spoken languages in the same modality, rather than simply a larger vocabulary, leads to the differences we observed in the Spanish-English bilinguals.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3164163/It-s-official-Speaking-one-language-makes-smarter-Bilingual-people-grey-matter-know-mother-tongue.html#ixzz3g8SxjWj8